Are you going to see the eclipse in August?

Discussion in 'Geographic Location' started by Sirius Glass, Jun 12, 2017.

  1. Theo Sulphate

    Theo Sulphate Subscriber

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    Low hills of a few hundred feet should suffice for being able to see the lighted rim effect on the horizons.

    In 1979, it became as dark as night very quickly. An experience you don't want to miss.

    What I hope to see from a mere few hundred feet elevation is just the near-instant onrush of the umbra (shadow of totality) across a broad plain that's already darkened by the penumbra.
     
  2. benveniste

    benveniste Subscriber

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    As a rule of thumb, on a 35mm camera you can expect to record an image of the sun (or moon) equal in size to 1/100th of your focal length. So with a 500mm lens, the sun will be a 5mm diameter circle on film. Apologies in advance for a digital image in this forum, but here's a full-frame shot of the moon done with that lens. I've already booked an RV and campground out of Casper, Wyoming for the eclipse. I strongly suggest making your plans now, as I was lucky to get a spot at the KOA two weeks ago.

    I will be using the 150-500mm with a filter from Thousand Oaks Optical. Once the filter arrives, I will experiment with adding a 1.4x teleconverter, but my guess is that I'll be using the lens "bare" on (sorry) a Nikon D800. With film, a 2x teleconverter might be reasonable.

    Moon.jpg
     
  3. Michael Firstlight

    Michael Firstlight Subscriber

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    Nice! I ended up getting the Sigma 150-600mm lens. What was the focal length used for that image? I'm considering the TC1401 1.4x extender as well. Some will want to fill the frame and go too long and forget that they have to leave quite a bit of extra room for the full outer corona which looks like it can extend upto 3 times the size of just the disc or the sun/moon - so given that detail, even adding a 1.4x might be overkill on a lens with a 500-600mm reach. Seems to me the ideal length to capture the total eclipse with the full corona (if we can get enough dynamic range), will be around 700mm as 800mm or greater might clip the extremities of the outer corona.

    Mike
     
  4. dmr

    dmr Member

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    Here's my biggest concern. Cloud cover! :sad:

    I'm currently making a list of possible viewing locations, all within 4-5 hours drive, from west-central Nebraska to central Missouri, which are right in the band of totality. I plan on checking the weather forecasts as the date approaches and, if necessary, plan to take off early morning if necessary. This will probably be my last time to conveniently observe and photograph a total solar eclipse, so I'm taking the day off and I'm gonna take advantage of it.

    My first choice will be one of a few places just southwest of here, right in the darkest of the dark.
     
  5. benveniste

    benveniste Subscriber

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    It was at the full 500mm. As I noted, I plan to try a 1.4x teleconverter (in my case a Kenko) before the event.
     
  6. dmr

    dmr Member

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    For those who care :smile: I think I'm approaching what I want regarding technique and exposure.

    I just posted these over at Cloudy Nights asking for comments about the lack of color.

    1/250:
    [​IMG]

    1/500:
    [​IMG]

    1/1000:
    [​IMG]

    1/2000:
    [​IMG]
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    I would have to fly to Denver, my friend would pick me up, and then we would drive to Fort Collins to stay overnight. Then we would drive three hours to see the eclipse and drive three hours back to Fort Collins to the motel, ... Additionally that if I were to do some photography I would have to take cameras, lenses, tripods, ... on the airplane and buy all the filters including binocular solar filters. I am thinking that it is not sounding worth the effort.
     
  8. tedr1

    tedr1 Member

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  9. dmr

    dmr Member

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    I was expecting white. The examples posted on the astronomy board showed distinct yellow/orange casts. I posted my shots and asked for clarification.
     
  10. Bud Hamblen

    Bud Hamblen Subscriber

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    The orange color can come from the filter being used. Some solar filters are nickel-chromium-iron deposited on glass. The image with this type of filter is decidedly orange. And then there is Photoshop.

    Bud
     
  11. Bud Hamblen

    Bud Hamblen Subscriber

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    I spot meter the center of the Sun and then dial it back a little, otherwise the Sun is overexposed. Average or matrix metering will not work because the meter is fooled by the background being so dark compared to the Sun. Make trial runs well in advance. NASA has good stuff on eclipse photography: https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEhelp/eclipsePhoto.html

    Bud
     
  12. dmr

    dmr Member

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    This is actually what the NASA SME confirmed. What I got was actually a true neutral density filter and actually I prefer it that way.
     
  13. Bud Hamblen

    Bud Hamblen Subscriber

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    Baader Solar Safety Film is close to neutral. If you want to make an inexpensive solar filter for a telephoto lens carefully cut a circle of Baader film and sandwich it between two clear glass filters for your lens. Baader film comes in an A4 size sheet (about 8x11) for around $40, although supplies might be running low right now. You and some friends could make several filters from one sheet. The Orion Telescopes and Binoculars glass filter optically isn't as good as Baader. I did an A-B test and the Baader image was obviously better. I tried a Kenko ND 100000 filter on a 55-300 zoom lens and was not at all satisfied. Baader has been best for me.
     
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  15. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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  16. Michael Firstlight

    Michael Firstlight Subscriber

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    The much bigger problem for those West of the Mississippi is all of the heavy smoke from the many forest fires I am reading lots of dire posts from folks on dPreview about the issue likely not to go away anytime soon.
     
  17. wsetser

    wsetser Member

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    I have no plan to photograph the eclipse, I'm going to enjoy the experience from our deck. We live on a hilltop on 50 secluded acres in Ten Mile TN, not very far from the center of the path of totality and will have 2 min 36 sec of totality. We've invited friends and family , including several photographers, to share it with us. The price of admission for the photographers is a print of there best shot. I may roam around with the Crown Graphic and take a few candids, but nothing more than that.
     
  18. Theo Sulphate

    Theo Sulphate Subscriber

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    Depending on your elevation above the surrounding terrain, you may be able to see and experience the onrush of the umbral part of the shadow at 2000 mph.

    The view of the darkened environs is equally as interesting as the eclipse itself. All along the horizon there should be a band of light, a sliver, where you're looking out at the distant part of the sky not in full shadow.
     
  19. APLJ

    APLJ Member

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    I'm definitely planning on seeing it! I haven't decided on a location yet, I'm not sure if I want to be up in the mountains or out on the coast, but it will be somewhere along the path of totality in Oregon. I don't have any special filters or a long enough lens, so I'm not planning on shooting the eclipse itself, but I'm going to keep my eyes out for other unique photographic opportunities.
     
  20. paul ron

    paul ron Member

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    i use a the media of 5.25" floppy discs as viewing filters.
     
  21. Wallendo

    Wallendo Subscriber

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    The eclipse will pass over my home. I anticipate taking snapshots, likely with a digital camera. At 2:30 PM, the event will be primarily overhead and any pictures I take will mostly look like everybody else's. Any photographs I take will be of the "I was there and took this picture" type. I have purchased a solar filter, so I feel obligated to use it. I will take a few analog shots for posterity.
     
  22. winger

    winger Subscriber

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    I have some decent viewing glasses so we'll at least see what we can see. We aren't going to have totality here, but it should be noticeable at least. I've thought about trying to do a multiple exposure on one sheet of 4x5, but I might just watch instead. And I'll likely have to take the little guy to see it with his cub scout den anyway (which might make it worth trying the 4x5 just for the reaction). Though with my luck it'll be cloudy here.
     
  23. Jim Jones

    Jim Jones Subscriber

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    I hope to also do multiple exposures on 4x5 sheet film. Three to five minutes between exposures seems to give a good spacing for the images. I suggest wrapping your Chaminox in a dark cloth to reduce any light leaks while the dark slide is out for so long. Having to pay attention to the clock is a bit of nuisance around a cub scout troop.
     
  24. OP
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    Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    I have viewing glasses and do not intend to take photographs. I do not know where you live, but will you invite me over?
     
  25. winger

    winger Subscriber

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    Yeah, not the most conducive environment for a big camera on a tripod either. I foresee complaints of boredom and a fair amount of goofing around before the moon is even visible in the same frame as the sun.
     
  26. juan

    juan Subscriber

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    I'm in an area that will get 75% or so coverage, so I think I'm going to take my digisnapper (I assume I can say that now) and go down to the pier and photograph people putting their eyes out.