Budget Tripod

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by JADoss23, Aug 10, 2017.

  1. JADoss23

    JADoss23 Subscriber

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    Have both a Mamiya RB67 and a speed graphic which both are very heavy cameras. Was looking to get a nice tripod that will support both of these while not breaking the bank. Don't really know much about tripods and was looking for some advice/recommendations. Thanks
     
  2. Mainecoonmaniac

    Mainecoonmaniac Subscriber

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    First off, I would not buy "bargain" tripods nor "kit" tripods. If you invest in a good tripod, it will last you decades if you take care of it. Cheap tripods will only frustrate you. i'm partial to Manfrotto tripods because they're well made and you can get parts for them fairly easily. If a part breaks on one, you don't have to throw away the tripod. I'm finding that some Chinese tripods like Giottos are a good value. I own a Giottos carbon fiber tripod for 3 years and so far, it's held up to foreign trips to 5 countries.
     
  3. Kino

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    Second the Manfrotto; they have a very nice selection of sticks and heads. They are very rugged, but the larger models can be very heavy.

    Added bonus; they appear often on the used market and as Tom suggests, replacement parts are easy to obtain.

    Short of that, a nice Gitzo Tiltall, or Star-D copy of a Gitzo tripod, might do the trick for you and they are relatively inexpensive.

    Replace a knob on this one and replace the cork on the head, and you'd have a serviceable tripod.
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Used-Star-D...209924?hash=item4668fe5844:g:tB4AAOSw8VJZij3F
     
  4. ChuckP

    ChuckP Subscriber

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    I'd get a used Bogen 3021 with 3047 head. Or their newer Manfrotto versions. Nice combination of height, weight and cost.
     
  5. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Bargain tripods are not bargains. Induro makes tripods which are almost as good as the big name, big price tripods for a whole lot less.

    http://www.indurogear.com/

    Capture.PNG
     
  6. Mainecoonmaniac

    Mainecoonmaniac Subscriber

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    I've own a Bogen 3021 for over 30 years. It's battle scarred and still has bits of gaff tape stuck to it. It's like an old friend. I broke the old locking levers off of it and had to replace the knobs with a different set. It's really made for 120 cameras, but I used it with my Sinar F2 4x5 on it until I could afford a larger Bogen tripod. I sold the original head with the octagonal plate and replaced it with an Arca Swiss ballhead. It was a stretch to buy it while trying to pay for college, but it was a great investment. Can't go wrong with Bogen. I work at university photography and filmmaking department and that's all I buy. I keep a collection of replacment parts because the students are really rough on the gear. Lots of broken knobs, lost plates and bent legs. The transport our tripods on their bikes, skateboards and on public transit. Bogen by far, it's the most durable and easy to repair and maintain.
     
  7. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    FWIW, Bogen is/was the US distributor for Manfrotto. If a tripod is/was branded a Bogen, it is a Manfrotto.
     
  8. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    The Tiltall was first made by Marchioni, then Leitz. The Star-D is a poor imitation, a real Tiltall is probably the best bargain tripod available.
     
  9. Mainecoonmaniac

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  10. OptiKen

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  11. Trail Images

    Trail Images Subscriber

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    I bought the Feisol 3301 years ago and use both an RB67 ProSD and a Wista 4x5 on the unit and it has been the best out of maybe 3 pods total I've ever owned. I bought it through Really Big Cameras and Kerry Thalman there. My most recent ball head is the Induro BHL3S.......once tightened down nothing moves, period.....:cool:
     
  12. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    a mid-sized used Manfrotto will do the job nicely.
     
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    JADoss23

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    Thanks for all of the input and knowledge. A lot of good recommendations. Wasn't wanting to get a cheaply made tripod just one more budget friendly. Is there anything i should look out for as far as tripod to hold a 4x5? What type of head will I need?
     
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  15. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    I do not like nor trust a ball head, only a pan head, like the Induro PHQ1.
     
  16. darinwc

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    I would recommend a manfrotto 3021 as well. The 3001 is a bit underweight for an rb67.
     
  17. MattKing

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    I use a mid-size Manfrotto ballhead (054) with my RB67, and am quite happy with it. I've never used a Speed Graphic, so cannot comment on it.
    It works well with my new pinhole camera too :smile:.
     
  18. Jim Jones

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    Even the Star-D was a decent tripod with some plastic where the others used metal. I used and abused one for years.
     
  19. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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  20. mgb74

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    It (the Star-D) was decent until those plastic knobs broke.

    Those round leg, aluminum, unsexy Bogen/Manfrotto tripods can go fairly cheap if you shop carefully. Another point to consider is how much height you need. Even the lowly Manfrotto 3001 would work for those cameras (in a pinch) IF the legs aren't extended.
     
  21. papagene

    papagene Membership Council Council

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    I regularly use a Bogen 3021 with my Kodak 2D 5x7 camera... plenty of support.
     
  22. jim10219

    jim10219 Member

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    I have an old Bogen 3036 with 3047 head. It'll hold my Sinai 4x5 with any lens and all the accessories or my barn door tracker and biggest lenses without shaking, even in moderate wind. It's rock solid and cost me a good bit less than $100. The down side is it weighs a ton! I built a sling to carry it because it's not easy to move along with one of my LF cameras, lenses, and film holders.

    I have a few other, lighter tripods, but none are anywhere near as stable or robust. None hold my 4x5 tripods without at least some shake. One day I'm going to buy a nice carbon fiber tripod so I can have a stable and portable tripod, but those are crazy expensive! Until that day, I'll just keep telling myself I need the exercise.
     
  23. btaylor

    btaylor Subscriber

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    I have a Bogen, bought it new over 30 years ago with the 3 way head. Very tough, easy to use, solid, but just too heavy to carry for any distance. I bought a wood Berlebach Report tripod for $300, it's easy to carry. It supports my 8x10 Calumet C1 well, and everything smaller of course. I like its simple construction and relatively light weight. I prefer a ball head for smaller cameras but for 4x5 and up I use a 3 way head-- I like my Gitzo 1570, inexpensive on the used market.
     
  24. Kino

    Kino Subscriber

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    The Star D variants I have are all aluminum; no plastic at all.
     
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    JADoss23

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    I ended up finding a Star D for 30 bucks so bought it to use for now until further down the road can buy a nice Bogen. Now just figuring out how to use it. Ha
     
  26. Kino

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    It should be a serviceable tripod until you figure out your specific requirements. I'd rather start with an inexpensive tripod and discover it's limitations for what I want to do and THEN purchase a nice one with all the features I need. You CAN buy a very expensive tripod that is totally unsuitable for what you want to do; which can be a very expensive learning experience.